The Joy of Education

I am half Guatemalan but grew up in the United States. Growing up in a developed world, I would often hear stories of my family in Guatemala that were hard to comprehend.


I am half Guatemalan but grew up in the United States. Growing up in a developed world, I would often hear stories of my family in Guatemala that were hard to comprehend. 

For example, my grandmother was born into a very poor family. She grew up sleeping on a dirt floor and worked from the time she was eight years old to help provide for her family. My grandma used her skills sewing to start a small business and escaped poverty through hard work and dedication. 

Though it has made her who she is today, my grandmother should have been able to live a normal life: she should have had the opportunity to finish elementary school instead of working; she should have been able to sleep on a real bed like I did as a child; she should have experienced her childhood rather than worrying about when she would eat her next meal. 

I find myself thinking of ways that could have helped my grandmother earlier in life and a practical solution would have been education. My grandmother’s path out of poverty was educating herself on a skill that produced a living.   

Education is, in so many ways, the key to helping people out of poverty. When people are given the tools and understanding of how to use their intellect, their talents, and their skills to better themselves, they find a way to change their lives.  

Through the Her Initiative, we empower girls specifically to stay in school by access to safe water. On average, girls spend anywhere from six to eight hours a day in the developing world collecting water. How will they have time to experience the joy of education if they have such a burden of responsibility? It has been so fun working with the Her Initiative and bringing safe water to girls everywhere. How will you get involved? 

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